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Frosty and returnable.

A man comes to his house tired, goes straight to the kitchen, opens the fridge and draws a beer.

A man comes to his house tired, goes straight to the kitchen, opens the fridge and draws a beer. A  beer porron. Sit on the armchair, turn on TV and enjoy your drink. That scene, which we are so used to seeing in movies, could hardly happen in an  Argentinian house .

Here, beer comes in a liter bottle: for us it is so common, that we don't know that this format is not so common in other countries; let alone the reuse of packaging. We all once promised the store store on the block to get the containers later, or we put them in the Chinaman's drawer and clarified, “I'll leave four.”And who didn't ever claim the bottles that were left in some friend's house after a party.

It is that — although in the last time cans gained more relevance thanks to a marketing strategy that managed to reduce their prices — the litre bottle, brown or green, is a classic in houses, restaurants and bars. Its advantages are many.

First of all, of course, it is cheaper than other formats. Secondly — and this is a beautiful side effect — the returnable packaging generates less waste and does not impact the environment. Thirdly, reuse involves the brewing, logistics, paper, graphic and stained glass industries, which are part of the recycling process.

But the most beneficial effect has to do with its mode of consumption: liter beer is shared, it opens between two, three or four. It's taken until it's over.It favors the democracy of choosing among all which we buy (or the unilaterality of the one who buys the one who wants, without consulting). In times of artisanal breweries and lemon porroncito, the beer in a liter bottle is a tradition that never goes out of style.

Rating: 0/5.